Media tagged with game drives

Photo Results

Baby Hyena

Baby Hyena

Baby Hyena

Baby Hyena

On the Game Ranger Course you never know what surprises you mind find in the bush!

A pair of white fronted bee-eaters

A pair of white fronted bee-eaters

A pair of white fronted bee-eaters

A pair of white fronted bee-eaters

Photo taken by Robert Staritz who came 3rd in ACE's photo competition. The white fronted bee-eater, Merops bullockoides, gets it's name from it's distinctive white forehead and diet of insects , which is almost always honey bees. These bee-eaters live in a very complex society, nesting in colonies made up of family clans where non-breeding birds become helpers for their breeding relatives.

Zebra with her foal

Zebra with her foal

Zebra with her foal

Zebra with her foal

Each zebra has its own unique set of stripes, which are as distinctive as fingerprints

Africa's wild dog

Africa's wild dog

Africa's wild dog

Africa's wild dog

Wild dogs were once widely distributed throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Today, viable populations may exist in only a handful of countries. Habitat loss and human persecution are the main causes of decline. Wild dogs fall victim to snaring, shooting, and speeding vehicles on roadways.

The White Rhino

The White Rhino

The White Rhino

The White Rhino

Under the hot African sun, rhinos find a suitable water hole and roll in its mud, coating their skin with a natural bug repellent and sun bloc

The Male Waterbuck -a classic African antelope

The Male Waterbuck -a classic African antelope

The Male Waterbuck -a classic African antelope

The Male Waterbuck -a classic African antelope

As its name would indicate, the waterbuck inhabits areas that are close to water in savanna grasslands, gallery forests and riverine woodlands south of the Sahara. Such habitats not only provide sustenance but long grasses and watery places in which to hide from predators.

Time for a drink

Time for a drink

Time for a drink

Time for a drink

Water holes are great for wildlife viewing

Thirsty work!

Thirsty work!

Thirsty work!

Thirsty work!

Having a long neck is great for feeding where no others can but makes drinking slightly tricky!

Cheetah at a kill

Cheetah at a kill

Cheetah at a kill

Cheetah at a kill

It is thought that cheetahs lose between approximately 10 to 15% of kills to the hyena.

Roan antelope

Roan antelope

Roan antelope

Roan antelope

Between 1986 and 1993, the roan antelope population in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, declined from about 450 to 45 animals. At Hanchi and Zingela these animals are being bred. Volunteers monitor their densities, age and condition on horseback.

Two warthogs stop for a drink

Two warthogs stop for a drink

Two warthogs stop for a drink

Two warthogs stop for a drink

They are the only pigs able to live in areas without water for several months of the year. By tolerating a higher than normal body temperature, the warthog is able to conserve moisture inside its body that might otherwise be used for cooling. When water is available warthogs drink regularly and enjoy wallowing in muddy places.

Thirsty elephant

Thirsty elephant

Thirsty elephant

Thirsty elephant

Elephants don't drink with their trunks, but use them as "tools" to drink with. This is accomplished by filling the trunk with water and then using it as a hose to pour it into the elephant's mouth.

Wild Cheetah

Wild Cheetah

Wild Cheetah

Wild Cheetah

The cheetah is a vulnerable species. Out of all the big cats, it is the least able to adapt to new environments.

Tracking cheetah on foot!

Tracking cheetah on foot!

Tracking cheetah on foot!

Tracking cheetah on foot!

Running at speeds between 112 and 120 km/h (70 and 75 mph) puts a great deal of strain on the cheetah's body. When sprinting, the cheetah's body temperature becomes so high that it would be deadly to continue; this is why the cheetah is often seen resting after it has caught its prey.

Black rhino

Black rhino

Black rhino

Black rhino

The rhino is prized for its horn. Not a true horn, it is made of thickly matted hair that grows from the skull without skeletal support. The major demand for horn is in Asia, where it is used in traditional medicine and ornamental carvings. On Phinda Wildlife Research Project you can help monitor these magnificent creatures.