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BLOG August 11, 2010

Volunteers Save a Cheetah's Life!

 

ACE volunteers on the Shimongwe Wildlife Veterinary Experience had a truly amazing and once in a lifetime experience last week!

“We were on our way home from releasing giraffe and zebra we had caught that day. It was starting to get dark and we had seen some game along the fence line. Jon jumped in his seat and told us that he had seen a leopard or a cheetah by the fence. Shannon, the assistant vet, stopped the vehicle told us it was probably a tree…. After us thinking it was probably too good to be true, I spotted a cheetah further up the fence line. She was tangled in the fence and wrapped around a tree, so we called for Dr Kriel to come and help. By the time Dr Kriel arrived to dart the cheetah it was completely dark. He had to dart her with a torch light on top of the dart gun! We then untangled the wire from around her pelvis and back legs and took her to the clinic. Dr Kriel knew that if she was left there, she would be shot on site if caught by the farmer. Luckily she wasn’t injured from the ordeal and was released onto a reserve two days later with two other male cheetah.” Kelly Holzinger

A volunteer spots the trapped cheetah at the fence line Dr Kriel removes the dart used to sedate the cheetahThe cheetah is relocated to the clinicThe cheetah is carefully assessed on route to the clinicThe cheetah is secured at the clinic and kept for observation for two days after the incidentVolunteers witness the release of the cheetah after it's recoveryrecovery

Once back at the clinic the cheetah was put in a secure cage and kept for observation for two days. The cheetah was then released into a safe environment. If the volunteers did not spot the cheetah and help it, it would definitely have died. They quite literally saved her life!

The cheetah population of Africa, like the leopard population, is unique in the sense that the majority of these populations of animals occur mainly outside of reserves. Cheetah are very good at being able to get through game proof fences allowing them to roam wherever they want to. This behaviour puts them at great risk as they enter cattle ranches and farms, and although protected they are more often than not shot on site. The cheetah population of South Africa is found most commonly within the Limpopo province of the country.

A project working hard towards solving this issue is the Zingela Predator Conservation Project. This is a dream project for anyone interested in big cat conservation and wanting to work on cheetah and leopard on a daily basis.

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