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BLOG October 29, 2009

White and Black Rhino Success at Phinda!

The black rhino declined drastically in the 1970s and 1980s due to poaching. To prevent extinction, many rhinos were translocated to fenced sanctuaries in the early 1990s. This effort appears to be succeeding, as 1994 was the first time in 20 years that rhino numbers did not decline.

The rhino is prized for its horn. Not a true horn, it is made of thickly matted hair that grows from the skull without skeletal support. The major demand for horn is in Asia, where it is used in traditional medicine and ornamental carvings.

Our Phinda Wildlife Research Project has the highest numbers of protected black and white rhino in the world and is famous for it’s conservation efforts with this species.

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